Identification Of Lymphatic And Blood Vessels

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the reactivity of various antibodies with porcine intestinal tissue. Twelve different antibodies on three different sections of the small intestine were  compared.

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the reactivity of various antibodies with porcine intestinal tissue. Twelve different antibodies on three different sections of the small intestine were  compared.  Some  antibodies  were  originally  directed  against  human  tissue,  namely CIV22,  C-3D5,  HM19/2,  KG  7/30,  Lu-5  and  PM-2K.  The  other  clones  PB1,  PE1,  PG1,  PM1, PP1 and PP2 have been developed against porcine tissue. The antibodies developed against human  tissue  still  work  for  swine  tissue  because  the  epitope  (the motif recognized by the antibody) is the same in both species. Testing was done on the twelve following preparations:

  • Duodenum, lengthwise and crosswise
  • Jejunum, lengthwise and crosswise
  • Ileum, lengthwise and crosswise

Every tissue probe was sectioned with a cryostat, brought onto a slide and fixed there. This was  followed  by  indirect  (two-step)  staining  with  twelve  different  antibodies,  each  one  in three  different  concentrations.  Hereby  the  method  of  indirect  staining  was  used.  First  a specific  antibody  is  applied,  after  which  a  secondary  antibody  carrying  the  color-giving peroxidase  was  added.  The  secondary  antibody  docks  onto  the  primary  antibody,  marking the  cell  or  tissue  structure.  Through  observation  under  a  light  microscope,  the  specific staining attributes of the antibodies and the quality of staining could be compared with each other. The results and discussion in this paper will focus on the jejunum cross sections, since it yielded the best results.

This  work  was  performed  entirely  by  Alexander  Pfeifer,  with  material  support  from  BMA Biomedicals, a division of Chemoforma AG. This publication is accessible through www.bma.ch and may be freely distributed citing ©Alexander Pfeifer.